K. A. Wisniewski

Teaching

Teaching imageBefore entering doctoral studies, I was Assistant Professor of English at Cecil College, in North East, MD.  Since then, I have taught a variety of undergraduate and graduate courses in Rhetoric and Composition, Literature, and History at Widener University, the University of Baltimore, and Stevenson University, among other institutions. In 2013, I helped pilot a new course on the Digital Humanities for the new M.A. program in Texts, Technologies, and Literature (TTL) in UMBC’s English Department.

My most recent courses include surveys and special topics on early American literature and upper division Composition courses.  Click here for a complete list of my courses.

RECENT COURSES

UPPER DIVISION & GRADUATE COURSES
  • ORIGINS AND ISSUES IN DESIGN (ART)
    This course is a survey of the history of graphic design from the Industrial Revolution through contemporary practice. Lectures illustrate major movements as the role of graphic design in society is explored including its relationship to industrial and architectural design. Both technological and societal changes and their impacts on design in past and present eras are addressed.
  • “SCRIBBLING WOMEN” AND THE AMERICAN PERIODICAL (ENGLISH)
    Many of the early United States’ most influential women writers first published their work in American newspapers and magazines. These writers–whom Nathaniel Hawthorne notoriously labeled “a damned mob of scribbling women”–were crafting serial novels, advocating abolition and enfranchisement, discussing fashion and child-rearing, agitating for laborers’ rights, and provoking political debate in the space of the periodical. This course will consider how periodical writers harnessed this print medium’s distinctive potential to challenge conceptions of womanhood and experiment with literary form. Authors may include Judith Sargent Murray, Margaret Fuller, Louisa May Alcott, Pauline Hopkins, Ida B. Wells, and Zitkala-Ša.
  • COMPOSITION & RESEARCH: THEORY & PRACTICE (ENGLISH)
    Focusing on research, analysis, reflection and writing about the kinds of documents produced in academic and professional disciplines, students produce a range of documents, such as informal reading responses, rhetorical analyses and an extended research project for inclusion in a course portfolio.
  • THE AMERICAN NOVEL (ENGLISH)
    This course focuses on the thematic and formal developments of the American novel from the 1790s to 1900.  The goal is to engage the history of the nineteenth-century American novel and current critical debates on that history.  Debated themes include domesticity, racial nationalism, the frontier and expansionism, romance and realism, sentimentalism, and social class.
    Sample Texts Here.
  • SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE I (ENGLISH)
    An examination of selected texts by major American authors from the colonial period through the Civil War. Sample texts include Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, Charles Brockden Brown, James Fenimore Cooper, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Edgar Allan Poe, Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, and Emily Dickinson.
LOWER DIVISION COURSES
  • THE UNITED STATES: COLONIAL AMERICA TO 1877 (HISTORY)
    Surveys the major events, ideas, and personalities critical to the development of the United States up to 1877. This course will examine the settlement and development of the American colonies, the American Revolution, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and will look at the collision of cultures and ideas that led to the formation of early America.
  • THE UNITED STATES: 1877 TO THE PRESENT (HISTORY)
    Surveys the major events, ideas, and personalities critical to the development of the United States from 1877 to the present. This course will examine the consequences of the Civil War and Reconstruction, Populism, Progressivism, the two World Wars, the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression, the Cold War, and the post-Cold War world.
  • RESEARCH & WRITING IN HISTORY (HISTORY)
    Introduces students to the use of the tools and methods of historians used to interpret and evaluate historical sources and to construct narratives based on primary and secondary research. In addition, students will develop skills in presenting history to a variety of general public audiences.
    Course Themes:  American Encounters with Nature; The History of the Book
  • LITERARY GENRES: THE NOVELLA (ENGLISH)
    A survey of the various forms, techniques, and themes of the novella. Attention is given to larger aesthetic concerns and social context.
    Sample Texts Here.
  • ENGLISH COMPOSITION (ENGLISH)
    A course designed to prepare undergraduates for serious academic inquiry, full participation in the intellectual life and mission of the university, and sustained self-directed learning throughout the curriculum. Students have the opportunity to select a section of ENGL 101 focused on a particular theme or topic. Through a variety of challenging reading and writing assignments engaging with the topic of choice (including a common reading), students become more careful and discerning readers. They will express insights and craft sustained arguments supported by carefully chosen evidence from primary and secondary material, and they will strengthen their ability to ask questions, evaluate, and synthesize complex information and draw conclusions.

Kevin Keynote Speech