K. A. Wisniewski

Three Poems by Olga Cabral

Electronic Tape Found in a Bottle If this small human testament completes its odyssey clears the curtains of fiery meteors crosses the rages of magnetic storms rides free of hydrogen … Continue reading

March 20, 2018 · Leave a comment


A few days ago, on New Year’s Eve, I completed my #365DayChallenge of posting one image a day on Instagram.  So, for now, I’m taking a little break from social … Continue reading

January 4, 2018 · Leave a comment

Mulberry Mummies Marshes

  “Mulberry, Mummies, Marshes: This History of Paper” Course Poster, 2017. My latest poster / broadside.  

December 5, 2017 · Leave a comment

Francis Hopkinson’s Ode to the Fourth of July 1788

This summer, I was awarded a fellowship and small stipend to continue my work on American printing history.  The goal was two engage in a reenactment or historical performance / … Continue reading

November 27, 2017 · Leave a comment

Types of Book-Binding: An Introduction

    Building on what I’ve called the Right PATH method (Performance/Production, Aesthetic, Theory, History), I wanted to add a little supplemental guide to types of binding we will cover … Continue reading

November 8, 2017 · Leave a comment

An Introduction to Book-Binding … Workshop

Two weeks ago, my paper history course had its latest workshop, on printing.  We were fortunate to use the under-utilized printing facility at Stevenson in a workshop led by printer, … Continue reading

November 6, 2017 · 4 Comments

Reading as Art: A Micro-Review

Reading as Art Simon Morris, editor. York: Information as Material, 2016. http://www.informationasmaterial.org/portfolio/reading-as-art/ In my own ongoing research investigations of reading publishing as arts practice, I came across this title last … Continue reading

September 19, 2017 · Leave a comment

Sampling: The Introduction to the History of Paper Course

I’m very excited about the upcoming weeks of my History of Paper course.  I’ve already blogged about setting up the course blog and the first posts will appear soon.  I … Continue reading

September 5, 2017 · Leave a comment

Paper Infographics

Walter Ong’s classic Orality and Literacy will be one of the first texts we’ll read in my “History of Paper” course this fall.  Attached to this reading/discussion, I’ll ask each … Continue reading

August 24, 2017 · Leave a comment

Coming Soon . . . Fall Course on the History of Paper

We’re just a week away from the fall semester!  I was a little disappointed last year after my pitch for a “History of the Book” special topics class was deemed … Continue reading

August 21, 2017 · 1 Comment

Summer Work 2017 — The Road Ahead

Well, another semester has finally come to an end, which typically means a new transition–a new type of busy season–is about to begin.  I can’t believe I haven’t formally posted … Continue reading

June 13, 2017 · Leave a comment

Forthcoming Textshop Issues: 2017-2018

Our next issue is only one week away!!! As we make the final edits to the forthcoming issue of TEXTSHOP EXPERIMENTS . . . Here’s what’s scheduled down the production … Continue reading

May 24, 2017 · Leave a comment

Printing History Videos: Some Bookmarks

This fall I will be teaching a course on printing history.  This post is really just a set of bookmarks for me–especially for the early weeks on Gutenberg and the … Continue reading

August 11, 2016 · 2 Comments

New Bob Brown Bio & Roving Eye Press Book Review

This month, Roving Eye Press celebrates the first biography of Robert Carlton “Bob” Brown, written by Craig Saper and published by Fordham University Press and Empire State Editions. Contemporary publishing, … Continue reading

May 16, 2016 · Leave a comment

Praise for Roving Eye Press

As Roving Eye Press begins work on our next set of publications for 2016, I reflect on what we’ve already achieved.  Since Fall 2014, we have re-published four Bob Brown … Continue reading

November 8, 2015 · Leave a comment

The Redesigned 10: The Future of Our Money

Yesterday, an L.A. bookstore started a campaign to make literary icon Joan Didion the female face of the ten dollar bill (#JoanOnTheTen).  Didion is arguably more popular than ever.  Last … Continue reading

August 14, 2015 · Leave a comment

Goody Goudy!

If there were an individual, readily recognized quality, or characteristic which the type designer could incorporate in drawings that would make any one type more beautiful, legible, or distinguished than … Continue reading

August 12, 2015 · Leave a comment

Type: Zapf!

Noted type designer, typographer, and calligrapher Hermann Zapf died last week, on June 4, at his home in Darmstadt, Germany at the age of 96.  The creator of approximately 200 … Continue reading

June 14, 2015 · Leave a comment

UK Research

For most of March, I’ve honed in on my dissertation–finishing up research on two chapters and writing.  I spent nearly two weeks in England attending a conference on eighteenth-century print … Continue reading

April 10, 2015 · Leave a comment

For the Crows: The Remix

I am fan of the work of Punctum Books and the journal postmedieval and, to some extent, those theorists investigating Object-Oriented Ontology (OOO).  I am especially interested in the ways … Continue reading

January 18, 2015 · Leave a comment

The Washington Press

This Date in History Sentimental? Perhaps.  I certainly enjoy anniversaries . . . those “this-date-in-history” snippets in print or on television.  Yesterday, I was reading up on printing history and … Continue reading

May 13, 2014 · Leave a comment

APHA Visit to Baltimore Museum of Industry

Overview of our Tour Despite having been born and raised in Baltimore, it’s funny that I don’t remember ever visiting the Baltimore Museum of Industry, not on a Saturday family … Continue reading

May 1, 2014 · Leave a comment

The Future of Printing . . . Never Tasted so Good!

The future of printing (and scholarship) is no longer the words on the page, no longer what you think about their conveyed meaning but how you (inter)act, how you create, … Continue reading

July 6, 2013 · Leave a comment