K. A. Wisniewski

MD/BY/MAIL: Omeka v. WordPress

I originally intended the second part of my review of Omeka to highlight a few specific benefits and problems or limitations in working with the platform.  Things have picked up a bit here, however, and I’ve already begun the shift into working on another project working with Augmented Reality.  Since this will prove to be much more time-consuming, I thought I’d just share a few links.  It is safe to say by now that many have (or will) try to make comparisons between Omeka and WordPress.  While some views and functions in Omeka will certainly look familiar to those with experience in WordPress, this is reasonable or expected, but let me just emphasize that while the former does have some blogging capabilities, its real intention is displaying and sharing digital collections and archives.  I thought the free version I was playing with was especially limited in theme options, but, that said, I’ve seen some really beautiful versions out there.

Returning to my sample site… My first project in WordPress lasted from September 2012 – February 2013.  Trying to create a blog around a particular theme, I created “Maryland By Mail” a blog stemming from my interest in the United States Post Office and chronicling my research on the historical development and cultural significance of the institution.  The site includes notes, essays, and personal photograph and ephemera collections on the USPS, as well as progress reports and news related to other topics and projects I was pursuing.  Pulling together my collection of post cards of Maryland post offices, this was a natural choice for my Omeka collection of the same name: http://mdbymail.omeka.net/.

Below are some shots of my Omeka progress (some prettier than others), but please check out the both MD/BY/MAIL sites.  I hope to develop this project further in the fall.

 

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This entry was posted on April 3, 2013 by in Digital Humanities, Work Report / Progress and tagged , , .
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